Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

22 free tools for data visualization and analysis

Sharon Machlis | Jan. 3, 2012
There are many tools around to help turn data into graphics, but they can carry hefty price tags.

JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit

What it does: InfoVis is probably not among the best known JavaScript visualization libraries, but it's definitely worth a look if you're interested in publishing interactive data visualizations on the Web. The White House agrees: InfoVis was used to create the Obama administration's Interactive Budget graphic.

What sets this tool apart from many others is the highly polished graphics it creates from just basic code samples. InfoVis creator Nicolas García Belmonte, senior software architect at Sencha Inc., clearly cares as much about aesthetic design as he does about the code, and it shows.

What's cool: The samples are gorgeous and there's no extra coding involved to get nifty fly-in effects. You can choose to download code for only the visualization types you want to use to minimize the weight of Web pages.

Drawbacks: Since this is not an application but a code library, you must have coding expertise in order to use it. Therefore, this might not be a good fit for users in an organization who analyze data but don't know how to program. Also, the choice of visualization types is somewhat limited. Moreover, the data should be in JSON format.

Skill level: Expert.

 

Runs on: JavaScript-enabled Web browsers.

Learn more: See demos with source code.

Protovis

What it does: Billed as a "graphical toolkit for visualization," this project from Stanford University's Visualization Group is one of the more popular JavaScript libraries for turning data into visuals; it's designed to balance simplicity with control over the display.

What's cool: One of the best things about Protovis is how well it's documented, with plenty of examples featuring visualization and sample code. There are also a large number of samplevisualization types available, including maps and some statistical analyses. This is a robust tool, capable of building graphics like this color-coded U.S. map with timeline slider.

 

Drawbacks: As is the case with other JavaScript libraries, it's pretty much essential for users to have knowledge of JavaScript (or at least some other programming language). While it's possible to copy, paste and modify code without really understanding what it's doing, I find it difficult to recommend that approach for nontechnical end users.

Skill level: Expert.

Runs on: JavaScript-enabled Web browsers.

Learn more: Try the How-to: Get Started Guide. You can also find examples of the types of graphics you can build with Protovis at the Protovis Gallery.

GIS/mapping on the desktop

There's a wide range of business uses for geographic information systems (GIS), ranging from oil exploration to choosing sites for new retail stores. Or, as The Miami Herald did for its Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of Hurricane Andrew, you can compare maximum wind speeds with damage reports and building information (and perhaps discover, for example, that the worst damage didn't happen in the areas suffering the heaviest winds, but in areas with a lot of new, shoddy construction).

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.