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12 things you may not have known about OS X Mavericks

Serenity Caldwell | June 13, 2013
Though both operating systems are set to arrive this fall, we know a lot more about iOS 7 than we do about its Mac sibling, OS X Mavericks. But with a little digging through the keynote slides and through Apple's OS X preview website, we were able to find 12 things you may not have heard or noticed about the company's next operating system.

Though both operating systems are set to arrive this fall, we know a lot more about iOS 7 than we do about its Mac sibling, OS X Mavericks. But with a little digging through the keynote slides and through Apple's OS X preview website, we were able to find 12 things you may not have heard or noticed about the company's next operating system.

The Finder goes full screen
OS X's new Finder Tabs option got some love during Monday's keynote, but there are a few other new perks coming to your new, tabbed Finder in the fall.

Window merge: If you've accidentally opened too many Finder windows, don't panic: A quick shortcut will merge your windows into one easily-managed Finder window, organized by tabs.


Gathering Finder windows.

The full screen Finder: Don't want to deal with individual windows during your file-finding expedition? In OS X Mavericks, you can make any Finder window go full screen.

Drag and drop: You've long been able to copy files from one Finder window to the other; with Mavericks, you'll be able to copy files from one tabbed pane to the other as well.

Drag to tag: Even if you have older files, you'll still be able to make use of OS X's new tagging options. Just drag the older file into the appropriate tagging pane inside the Finder, and that file will be automatically tagged with that label.

Do more with displays
We've been waiting years for Apple to figure out a solution for full-screen apps and multiple displays, but it looks like our waiting will be over this fall when OS X Mavericks arrives. In addition to running full screen apps on each display and easily accessing the menu and toolbar, here are a few other nifty multiple display tricks coming in the fall.

Drag assets across full screen apps: Even if you're working full screen on both displays, you can still share information between apps. Say you have iPhoto and Keynote open (as Federighi did during Monday's keynote): You can drag a photo from iPhoto across the first display into Keynote on the second.

Full screen apps and Mission Control: In Mountain Lion, your full screen apps appear as separate desktops along the top of your Mission Control dashboard. You've always been able to drag and drop the order of those displays within Mission Control, but soon you'll be able to move full screen apps across displays. Accidentally opened iTunes in full screen on display number two? Just open Mission Control and drag it to display number one.

 

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