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10 hot Hadoop startups to watch

Jeff Vance | April 17, 2014
As data volumes grow, figuring out how to unlock value becomes vastly important. Hadoop enables the processing of large data sets in a distributed environment and has become almost synonymous with big data. Here are 10 startups with solutions for unlocking big data value.

3. Altiscale

What They Do: Provide Hadoop-as-a-Service (HaaS).

Headquarters: Palo Alto, Calif.

CEO: Raymie Stata, who was previously CTO of Yahoo.

Founded: March 2012

Funding: Altiscale is backed by $12 million in Series A funding from General Catalyst and Sequoia Capital, along with investments from individual backers.

Why They're on This List: Hadoop has become almost synonymous with Big Data, yet the number of Hadoop experts available in the wild cannot hope to keep up with demand. Thus, the market for HaaS should rise in step with big data. In fact, according to TechNavio, the HaaS market will top $19 billion by 2016.

Altiscale's service is intended to abstract the complexity of Hadoop. Altiscale's engineers set up, run, and manage Hadoop environments for their customers, allowing customers to focus on their data and applications. When customers' needs change, services are scaled to fit — one of the core advantages of a cloud-based service.

Customers include MarketShare and Internet Archive.

Competitive Landscape: The HaaS space is heating up. Competitors comes from incumbents, such as Amazon Elastic MapReduce (EMR), Microsoft's Hadoop on Azure, and Rackspace's service based on Hortonworks' distribution. Altiscale will also compete directly with Hortonworks and with such startups as Cloudera, Mortar Data, Qubole, and Xpleny.

Key Differentiator: Altiscale argues that they are "the only firm to actually provide a soup-to-nuts Hadoop deployment. By comparison, AWS forces companies to acquire, install, deploy, and manage a Hadoop implementation — something that takes a lot of time."

4. Trifacta

What They Do: Provide a platform that enables users to transform raw, complex data into clean and structured formats for analysis.

Headquarters: San Francisco, Calif.

CEO: Joe Hellerstein, who in addition to serving as Trifacta's CEO is also a professor of Computer Science at Berkeley. In 2010, Fortune included him in their list of 50 smartest people in technology, and MIT Technology Review included his Bloom language for cloud computing on their TR10 list of the 10 technologies "most likely to change our world."

Founded: 2012

Funding: Trifacta is backed by $16.3 million in funding raised in two rounds from Accel Partners, XSeed Capital, Data Collective, Greylock Partners, and individual investors.

Why They're on This List: According to Trifacta, there is a bottleneck in the data chain between the technology platforms for Big Data and the tools used to analyze data. Business analysts, data scientists, and IT programmers spend an inordinate amount of time transforming data. Data scientists, for example, spend as much as 60 to 80 percent of their time transforming data. At the same time, business data analysts don't have the technical ability to work with new data sets on their own.

 

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