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French publishers want to charge Google for republishing articles

Loek Essers | Sept. 6, 2012
French publishers have relaunched a discussion about the republishing of headlines and the first paragraph of articles by Google and other search engines without compensating the provider of the content. Plans to craft a law that allows publishers to charge search engines are back on the table after the German cabinet gave its support last week to a draft law that aims to do precisely that, said the French National Magazine Publishers' Society (SEPM).

French publishers and creators of artistic work have already pushed for measures to collect part of the revenue that is earned by online advertising networks and search engines by republishing content. Last year a proposed "Google tax" law that aimed to compensate the creative industry for losses due to online piracy wasn't adopted said Frappat. The tax suggested would have been honor assessed, with advertising network operators such as Google, Microsoft, AOL and Yahoo required to declare how much revenue they made.

Despite the failure of that proposal, the issue still remains important, said Frappat. The discussions about a possible French approach are still at a very early stage, but the publishing industry would like very much to push this further, he said.

A Google representative for this story did not immediately offer a reaction to the French proposals, but last week Google spokesman Kay Oberbeck reacted angrily to the German proposals, saying that the draft law there is "a threat to the freedom of information," would mean massive damage to the German economy and would leave Germany behind internationally as a place for business.

 

 

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