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Assange attorneys raises risk of unfair rape trial in Sweden

Jeremy Kirk | Feb. 7, 2011
Embattled WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appeared in a British court on Monday, where his attorney laid out a series of arguments why he should not be extradited to Sweden to face questions over sexual assault allegations.

FRAMINGHAM, 7 FEBRUARY 2011 - Embattled WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appeared in a British court on Monday, where his attorney laid out a series of arguments why he should not be extradited to Sweden to face questions over sexual assault allegations.

Assange, wearing a dark suit and tie, entered Belmarsh Magistrates' Court in southeast London shortly before 10 a.m. as WikiLeaks supporters demonstrated outside holding placards and wearing orange jumpsuits similar to those of inmates at Guantanamo Bay.

Assange, 39, of Australia, has been accused of unlawful coercion, sexual molestation and rape, the accusations stemming from incidents with two women in Sweden in August. He says the encounters were consensual.

The hearing, expected to last two days, deals with the Swedish government's request that Assange be extradited to Sweden for questioning.

Geoffrey Robertson, Assange's attorney, argued that an extradition order is improper since Swedish authorities have not charged him with a crime but merely want to question him. Robertson argued that his client has made himself available to Swedish prosecutors, and that Assange has already been questioned once while he was still in Sweden after the incidents.

Clare Montgomery, representing the British government, said that although Assange has not been formally charged, the extradition is merited since Swedish prosecutors have "sufficient intention to prosecute."

The offenses that Assange has been accused of would not be considered offenses under British law, Robertson said. Sweden has further described the offenses as "minor rape," which carries a maximum sentence of four years there, Robertson said.

Robertson also attacked the Swedish legal system, where members of the public and press are excluded from sexual assault trials. "There is a real risk of a flagrant violation of his rights, Robertson said.

Assange turned himself in to U.K. police on Dec. 7 after a European Arrest Warrant naming him was issued in Sweden. He spent a week in custody before being granted bail on the condition he turn in his passport, wear an electronic monitoring device and check in regularly with police. He is now staying at a manor in the East of England owned by Vaughan Smith, founder of the journalism organization the Frontline Club.

In a brief statement outside the courtroom after the hearing, Assange said a "black box" has been applied to his life with the word "rape" on it. He also thanked his supporters.

Assange and his legal team have stated they believe the Swedish prosecutors' pursuit is tied to WikiLeaks' release of U.S. diplomatic cables, which angered the U.S. government but drew praise from others.

 

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