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Study: Business leaders lacking confidence in IT

Steve Ragan | Nov. 22, 2013
When it comes to the readiness of critical IT requirements, including availability, security, as well as backup and recovery, business leaders in some of the world's top markets lack confidence in their ability to cope and recover from disruptive incidents.

When it comes to the readiness of critical IT requirements, including availability, security, as well as backup and recovery, business leaders in some of the world's top markets lack confidence in their ability to cope and recover from disruptive incidents.

Data from a recent global study conducted by Vanson Bourne, on behalf of EMC, shows that a reduction in investment in availability, security, backup, and recovery has threatened IT's ability to deal with disruptive events, including unplanned downtime, data loss, or security incidents. Based on the responses from those who took part in the study, one of the underlying issues appears to be communication.

Vanson Bourne interviewed 3,200 business leaders across the globe, and found that 45 percent of them felt that senior executives within their respective organizations lacked confidence in the adequacy of existing availability, security, and backup and recovery deployments. This lack of confidence was surely compounded by the fact that a majority of them experienced one or more disruptive incidents.

Over the last twelve months, 61 percent of the respondents suffered a disruptive incident, such as unplanned downtime, a security breach, or data loss. As a result, their organizations were impacted in a number of different ways. A majority of the respondents reported employee productivity loss due to the incident, but that is in addition to lost revenue, lost customer confidence or loyalty, lost business opportunities, product or service delays, or problems getting a product or service to market.

Looking at disruptive incidents, in relation to data protection, security, or availability, as well as the pain that occurs because of them -- a majority of respondents said that budgets were the reason that their organizations failed to achieve success. However, 35 percent also noted workload or resource constraints, 33 percent claimed that a lack of planning and anticipation, and 32 percent said a lack of knowledge and skills led to their problems. At the same time, one in five pointed to a lack of trust in existing technology as a key limiter to success.

When it comes to the top security concerns, the number one item was third-party application access, followed by intellectual property protection. However, a majority of the respondents admitted that they mainly use anti-Virus and firewalls to protect these assets. Less than twenty percent claimed to have implemented an intelligence-driven security program (SIEM), and just over ten percent claimed to have implemented some type of GRC program, despite many regulatory measures that require strict monitoring and controls.

"The four big megatrends in information technology today are cloud computing, Big Data, social networking and mobile devices. Adoption and maturity of these trends must float upon a sea of trust -- trust that my information is secure in the cloud, trust that my data wont be lost or stolen, trust that my IT will be operational when it needs to be -- which, these days, is all the time," David Goulden, EMC's President and Chief Operating Officer, said in a statement.

 

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