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IT execs hope iPad, PlayBook can boost decision-making process

Matt Hamblen | Feb. 2, 2011
IT executives at Chevron and TD Bank are testing whether tablets like Apple's iPad and the upcoming BlackBerry PlayBook can be used to improve workflow processes int their companies.

"We absolutely see the benefit [of tablets]," Codack said in a separate interview prior to the conference. He said said the firm is testing nine different patterns of work with 250 workers in separate trials that will finish in late 2011 and 2012. For example, mortgage specialists will test the use of a tablet to take an order while visiting a customer in a home, he said.

The PlayBook "has the security fabric built and intuitively that [device] makes sense," Codack said. Tablets and workforce applications on them are "not revolutionary, but help you think in a forward-looking and value-added way."

Finding more ways to be forward-looking was the reason Codack said he was attending the winter IVI conference.

He wanted to determine whether IVI's approach for making IT investment and operating decisions could be put to use at TD Bank. The financial services firm has a federated approach to IT systems, where several CIO's run various pieces of the operation. The IT operation may benefit from a more comprehensive approach, he said.

IVI has created the the IT Capability Maturity Framework,which has been compared to better-known IT management schemes such as the Information Technology Infrastructure Library and Six Sigma. About 100 companies, including Chevron and five other other global energy producers, are using the IVI process, said Martin Curley, an IVI director and global director of innovation at Intel.

Bruenig said Chevron is "really just adopting" IT-CMF as a way to infuse innovation and find efficiencies as the company undergoes IT changes that began more than two years ago after the arrival of a new CIO.

Curley said Chevron and the other five major energy companies compared IT operations in the past year to benchmark ways to lower IT costs and add value to their organizations.

The use of tablets and other mobile devices are seen by all the IT-CMF companies as a way to push out critical company information in different ways as well as "to receive and capture information in ways that managers couldn't before," said Ralf Dreischmeier, a senior partner at Boston Consulting Group. "There's a further level of richness [with mobile devices] that companies never had before," he said. "You can be a much more efficient player."

 

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