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Guest View: Top 10 trends that will impact IT organisations in 2014

David Neo | Nov. 19, 2013
In order to help companies embrace change, deliver a positive user experience and focus on solving business performance challenges, Riverbed has put together a list of the Top 10 Trends that will impact IT organisations in 2014.

In 2014, enterprise IT teams should seek to harness the power of change. Savvy IT organisations understand that the right technology can positively impact their business. These organisations are responding to the need for change by seeking to harness those technologies that can differentiate their business, provide a better customer experience and ultimately help them gain a competitive edge. 

In order to help companies embrace change, deliver a positive user experience and focus on solving business performance challenges, Riverbed has put together a list of the Top 10 Trends that will impact IT organisations in 2014.  

1.      DevOps teams become the norm, not the exception - DevOps, which started as an offshoot of Agile development, with a focus on achieving continuous delivery, will continue to catalyze change across IT departments on how teams from different IT domains will collaborate, which tools are employed to facilitate friction-less delivery, and the skill-sets that become increasingly desirable. Today dedicated DevOps teams are found in hardware and software companies, as well as a fraction of progressive enterprise IT departments. In 2014, expect specific DevOps teams to sprout up in all large enterprises.

2.      Industrial Internet gets vertical (sometimes called the Internet of Things) - As more objects become embedded with sensors and gain the ability to communicate, the resulting information networks promise to create new business models, improve business processes and reduce costs and risks.  Many industries are gaining a competitive advantage from "connectedness", among them:  fleet management (for tracking goods and vehicles), consumer electronics and retail (stock control). Manufacturing, oil and gas, automotive, security, transport and even environmental management (smart cities) are gaining in this area. In 2014 adoption increases as companies continue to search for competitive advantages that also drive cost savings.

3.      Monolithic cloud strategies fade - Companies are moving towards automating the dynamic shifting of workloads from one cloud service to another for optimum performance, price and availability.  IT will gain experience and confidence in moving a workload out of the path of a super typhoon, to a lower cost service provider, or to a service provider closer to the end-user so the latency is minimized. In 2014, companies will move beyond the "I have a cloud strategy" to "I have a multi-cloud strategy."

4.      Software defined everything hits production - A software-defined infrastructure is about decoupling the hardware that executes the data transactions from the software layer that orchestrates them. Rather than individual elements (compute, storage, and networking), infrastructure will be treated as a set of resources required for specific workloads. The goal is about using software to create an underlying infrastructure that can be managed holistically as part of the business.  In this world, the application, end-user and the business are king.  In 2014 we'll see organisations finally implement software-defined architectures to achieve continued flexibility and control. Expect individual terms like "software defined networking" and "software defined storage" - which are just means to an end - to give way to larger concepts around the software defined data center and software defined branch.

 

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