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How to rise to the challenges of big data and diversity

Divina Paredes | Oct. 12, 2016
For Dexibit founder and CEO Angie Judge, celebrating Ada Lovelace Day is just one way to help encourage women into science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) careers.


Angie Judge, from software engineer to Dexibit CEO.

Angie Judge recalls attending a lecture for her software engineering course and finding there was only one other female in a class of 90.

This was in 2002, when Judge was completing her bachelor degree at AUT University.

“It feels like a long time ago, but the reality is it wasn't,” says Judge, now CEO of data analytics company Dexibit.

After completing her degree in business, strategic management and organisational change, Judge worked for multinational technology companies including Amdocs and Hewlett-Packard.

“I had the same experience of often finding myself the only woman in the room, or one of two in a large group,” says Judge.

“I am just determined to make sure we don’t have that kind of environment for Dexibit.”

Just a year old, Dexibit now has customers in New Zealand, Australia, the United States and Canada. These include the Auckland Art Gallery to the Smithsonian in Washington DC.
Just a year old, Dexibit now has customers in New Zealand, Australia, the United States and Canada. These include the Auckland Art Gallery to the Smithsonian in Washington DC.

Judge founded Dexibit just over a year ago. The company provides analytics on visitor behaviour onsite and online, enabling data driven decisions that increase visitation for museums and other cultural institutions.

“We work with data from the visitor's physical presence via mobile signals, online traffic, social media, commercial transactions, weather and more, presenting personalised, real-time dashboards to museum managers,” says Judge.

Dexibit now has 10 staff, with customers in New Zealand, Australia, the United States and Canada. “From Auckland Art Gallery to the Smithsonian.”

“We are also diverse,” adds Judge. “Forty per cent of our team are women and we speak 13 languages amongst us.”

Honouring a tech pioneer

Judge shares her experience, as she talks about the significance of Ada Lovelace Day, which is held every second Tuesday of October.

Ada Lovelace Day or ALD, is an international day celebrating the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths, known as STEM.

The day was named for Lovelace, considered the world’s first computer programmer, an English mathematician in the 19th century.

According to a website on famous scientists, Lovelace “took part in writing the first published program and recognised for the first time that computers could do much more than just calculations”.

October 11 is Ada Lovelace Day, which pays tribute to women in STEM careers.
October 11 is Ada Lovelace Day, which pays tribute to women in STEM careers.

Judge is keen to promote the legacy of Lovelace.

 

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