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UK must better harness home grown talent to tackle digital skills crisis, says Taskforce

Antony Savvas | July 25, 2014
Britain faces a growing shortage of digital skills in the economy and must better harness home grown talent to succeed in a "second industrial revolution", the UK Digital Skills Taskforce warns today.

Britain faces a growing shortage of digital skills in the economy and must better harness home grown talent to succeed in a "second industrial revolution", the UK Digital Skills Taskforce warns today.

Led by Maggie Philbin, former Tomorrow's World presenter, technology broadcaster and chief executive of TeenTech, the Taskforce was launched by government opposition leader Ed Miliband last year, to make a series of "independent recommendations to inform political debate ahead of the general election".

Before launching the Taskforce, Miliband called for big IT companies to hire a UK apprentice for every non-EU IT worker they hire here, in an attempt to tackle the country's IT skills shortage.

A Taskforce report says the need for digital skills is only going to grow, with the Science Council estimating that the ICT workforce alone will grow by 39 percent by 2030.

A 2013 O2 report, The Future Digital Skills Needs of the UK Economy, estimated that 745,000 additional workers with digital skills will be needed to meet rising demand from employers between 2013 and 2017.

Yet as of March 2014, points out the Taskforce, there were still 975,000 young people in the UK who were not in education, employment or training, despite Microsoft reporting that there were 100,000 unfilled vacancies in partner companies across the UK last year.

The report - Digital Skills for Tomorrow's World - is being presented to shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna today, at a launch event at Telefonica's Wayra startup academy in London.

The report makes a number of recommendations, including:

The government should invest at least an additional £20 million by 2020 to help successfully embed the new computing curriculum in schools across England. Current funding levels of £3.5 million equate to just £175 per school, says the Taskforce.

Digital skills are essential not just to the labour market, but to participation in everyday life. The government should invest to extend basic digital skills to all of the UK population by 2020, sharing the cost with businesses and the charities sector.

Computing should become a fourth "core science". There should be a digital component to education and training opportunities for young people up to the age of 19.

Radical simplification of the apprenticeship system to ensure that more digital businesses - especially SMEs - invest in apprentices. The "process remains too opaque for businesses of all sizes", says the report.

A new Digital Challenge for schools, modelled on the successful London Challenge initiative, to foster partnerships between schools and businesses and raise standards of teaching, showcase career opportunities and inspire a new generation into technology

Sandwich years and industrial placements should be expanded for computer science students, and university computer science departments should have active Industrial Advisory Boards to help keep them updated with industry developments.

 

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