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Texas, Florida, North Carolina lead IT job growth in first half of 2014, study finds

Fred O'Connor | Aug. 13, 2014
IT employees realise their skills are in demand and are seeking bigger salaries from potential employers.

Portland's technology scene helped Oregon, with 3.57 percent growth, take the fourth spot. The city "has really turned into a nice technology hub with a lot of support from the venture community. You see a whole bunch of startups coming in and incubators pop up there," said Goli.

Rounding out the list were Massachusetts in seventh with a growth rate of 2.91 percent, New Jersey in eighth at 2.84 percent, Michigan in ninth at 2.72 percent, and Missouri in 10th place at 2.1 percent.

In other hiring trends, Goli noted that an improving economy is providing companies with confidence to increase full-time jobs. While contract work is still popular, companies are starting to weigh the expense of consultants, who command high salaries for temporary work, against adding permanent positions.

"Companies now want to start developing these skills for the longer term and not just for the short term," he said.

Businesses realize that IT professionals have the technology skills that they previously turned to consultants to provide. For example, four years ago when companies were getting into mobile development -- a background many IT workers then lacked -- hiring a consultant was the easiest way to acquire those skills. "There are a lot more mobile developers now," Goli said.

But hiring full-time talent may come at a price. More IT candidates are rejecting job offers and asking for more money compared to six months ago, said Goli. Technology professionals are "choosier" and realize that employers need their skills.

IT professionals, though, are more open to relocating for a job, especially for the right compensation, he added.

 

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