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Relocation costs now a sticking point for job-hunting security managers

Bob Violino | May 6, 2015
In an effort to cut costs, many companies hire local candidates to fill CSO positions. But are they also sacrificing quality for their security program?

Larger companies have always had more generous and comprehensive relocation packages than smaller and mid-size companies, Lavinder adds, "but even some of our larger clients are trimming relocation packages a little. In one case, the company cut out some minor things they had covered in the past, such as the cost of a new driver's license and car registration. These are minimal costs and candidates would never know they had been covered in the past, so it's easy for employers to make a change like that with little consequence."

Another security executive recruiter, Wils Bell, president of SecurityHeadhunter.com, has encountered refusals by companies to cover relocation costs "on many occasions."

One example was a larger company that was located in a big city. "Their position had been open almost a year when I was contacted about working on their search," Bell says. "The position offered a good salary, career advancement for the right person, challenge, etc. What it did not offer was any type of relocation."

Corporate leadership had decided that since the business was located in a larger city, it should be able to draw from the local market. "They still were holding onto this policy even after a year of searching and interviewing several candidates through numerous sources," Bell says.

And among companies that do cover relocations costs, in many cases the offer is not as generous as in the past, Bell says.

"For the vast majority of positions, relocation has changed from years ago," Bell says. "Getting a 'Cadillac' relocation package is many times being replaced by a specific dollar amount [such as] $3,000, $5,000 or $7,500, and you move yourself. Of course, you'll need receipts to back up all expenses."

These types of situations, with either no relocation packages or limited packages, have been on the rise, Bell says. "I don't see it as often at the C-level as I do the mid- to senior-level positions, but it is definitely increasing," he says.

Years ago, relocation packages and their perks were fairly standard, Bell says. "Over the years they have decreased in value," he says. "In my opinion, money is the main driving factor. Firms could spend a great deal of money moving someone. The actual move, closing costs, house hunting trips, temporary housing, etc. all added up. It is easier for many firms to just offer a flat dollar amount."

Some organizations are more likely to provide relocation packages only for the higher-level security jobs.

"Often, organizations see the value of finding the precise organizational and skill-set fit at or above the director level, making relocation necessary," says Domini Clark, principal at Blackmere Consulting, which recruits information security professionals.

 

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