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Matching students with their dream career (before college)

Sarah K. White | Oct. 28, 2015
Can a quick personality test help match you with a career that will play to your strengths and interests? CareerBuilder says it can.

Matching students with their dream career (before college)
Credit: Kevin Dooley via Flickr

Millennials catch a lot of flak. B stereotypes aside, there is one thing most people can agree on. Today's young people are saddled with student-loan debt and are often underemployed. But what if there was a way for students to make sound decisions before they embark into higher education and their careers to ensure they are on the right path before taking on loans and years of education? That's what CareerBuilder is trying to do with its newly launched free website, Find Your Calling, which aims to help students figure out what career path suits them best and the education they need to achieve their goals.

The stats on college success

According to data from a 2013 study by the National Center for Education Statistics, six years after enrolling in a bachelor's degree program in 2007, 41 percent of students still hadn't completed the program or had dropped out completely.

CareerBuilder attributes this drop-off to a general feeling of uncertainty for students when it comes to figuring out what path they want to take. In a study from CareerBuilder, 41 percent of workers reported that they wished they had received more help and guidance before choosing a career path. Combine that with another CareerBuilder study where one in four high school seniors report having "no idea what career they want to pursue," and you've got a recipe for career regret.

The same study also found that students really don't have an authoritative or informative place to turn when they are ready to figure out their futures. In fact, 23 percent of high school seniors surveyed said they chose their career based off a TV show or movie. Only 34 percent turned to parents or family members for help, 19 percent looked to their teachers for help and 53 percent took their search online.

"The skills gap in our country is in large part an 'information gap' -- many young people are unaware of jobs that are in high-demand, pay well, and are aligned with what they're passionate about," said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation, in a press release from the company.

Basically, it seems that students just aren't sure what opportunities exist after high school, and it's leaving some stuck in programs they don't love or in careers that aren't for them. By heading this problem off before it comes time to apply to colleges, students -- and parents -- can make sure they are on the right track before they've invested time and money.

 

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