Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

How Glassdoor's reviews help you find your dream job

Sarah K. White | June 5, 2015
People love reviews. Just look at Amazon, TripAdvisor or Yelp. And now, the public's growing desire for reviews has extended to the job search, as evidenced by Glassdoor's steady rise in popularity since its launch in 2008.

People love reviews. Just look at Amazon, TripAdvisor or Yelp. And now, the public's growing desire for reviews has extended to the job search, as evidenced by Glassdoor's steady rise in popularity since its launch in 2008.

Before Glassdoor, job seekers were often left in the dark when trying to get a deeper understanding of company culture and salary expectations. And, unfortunately, most people couldn't find out about a negative work environment until a few months after they started the job.

With Glassdoor, job seekers can feel more in control of their career decisions, and hopefully figure out if a job will be a good fit before accepting an offer.

How it works

Glassdoor is an open community that allows employees and employers to create free accounts in order to read, post and respond to company reviews, salary data and more. Just as employees can go on and rate their companies, past or present, employers can go on to check on the company's overall scores and reviews.

When you leave a review on Glassdoor, you can leave scored ratings on different aspects of the company ranging from 1 to 5. This includes work-life balance, compensation and benefits, CEO approval, and more. Those leaving reviews are required to include both pros and cons, for a well-rounded review, rather than just entirely praising or blasting a company. It forces even the unhappiest of employees to actually consider the positives they can glean from their jobs.

It seems people are pretty fair too, with the average review for a company on Glassdoor at 3.2, according to Samantha Zupan, senior director of Glassdoor's Global Corporate Communications, and the average CEO approval rating at 70 percent.

"Because we are dealing with such a sensitive subject matter we have asked for both pros and cons in the reviews from day 1," says Zupan, "As a result of that, we have about 70 percent of people who are leaving reviews for their company who are saying they are okay or satisfied with their job and company."

How are reviews moderated?

A computer system first filters through reviews to find any that clearly go against the terms of use and community guidelines. Any reviews that pass through the computer system are then reviewed by actual employees at Glassdoor. Any user — employer or employee — can also flag a review if they think it goes against the terms of use or community guidelines.

Every review has to follow a certain set of rules as outlined in the community guidelines and terms of use. One of those requirements is that users can only name C-Suite executives in a review, so you can't log on to leave a comment about coworkers or managers in a negative way. And all reviews must be related to the workplace, which leaves some reviews open to interpretation.

 

1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.