Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

10 signs you need to update your resume

Sharon Florentine | Feb. 24, 2016
In a perfect world, you'd treat your resume like a living document and update it continuously throughout your career. In the real world, family, home and professional responsibilities can get in the way. Here are 10 events that call for a resume refresh.

In a perfect world, you'd treat your resume like a living document and update it continuously throughout the year, making changes and additions each time you successfully completed a project, nailed a huge sales goal or switched to a new role within your company. In the real world, however, family, home and professional responsibilities can get in the way. However, not keeping your resume up-to-date can deter hiring managers and recruiters from starting conversations about new opportunities.

If it's been a while since you've refreshed your resume and you want to be ready in the event a new opportunity presents itself, Andrew Ysasi, president of Admovio and an executive career consultant and resume writer, offers 10 signs you need to make changes.

1. You've received an award

Did you receive a performance, sales, innovation or other type of merit-based award? How about a community award for volunteer work, or for non-work-related accomplishments? Make sure you add these to your resume with a short explanation of the criteria for selection and what skills and knowledge you relied on to win.

2. You've completed a large, important project

Did you and your team design, develop and build a killer new app for a client -- ahead of schedule? Have you recently found ways to reduce cost or increase speed-to-market for your company? Have you hit major sales goals, or achieved great customers service? These are all areas current and potential employers focus on when considering whether to promote you or when searching for candidates.

3. You've started a new initiative -- or business unit, or branch, etc.

If you've created a working group to handle a new line of business, been instrumental in successfully organizing and opening a new branch office, or even created an informal community at work -- say, for working moms; or a hiking club, add that to your resume. It shows you're a team player, able to multi-task and juggle multiple aspects of both work and life seamlessly.

4. You have a new boss who's an executive or a senior manager

If the reporting structure at your organization has changed, it can be important to note this in your resume, especially if you now report to a C-level executive or another member of IT leadership. For example, if, as a software development manager you report directly to a CIO or a CTO, mentioning that on your resume can demonstrate that your insight, experience and knowledge are often solicited by IT leadership, and that you can provide valued advice to the C-suite.

5. Your address, phone number, email or other personal information has changed

This is a bit of a no-brainer, but it bears repeating: If you've moved, changed your name due to a marriage or divorce; gotten a new mobile or landline phone number or switched to a different email address, update your resume immediately. You don't want to miss out on that dream job because a recruiter or hiring manager can't reach you.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.