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Your data centre colocation, your home: finding the right premise to sustain and grow IT and business operations

Shehara Viswanathan, Head of Cloud Portfolio, Telstra | Oct. 14, 2016
For most companies, the process of licensing space from a data centre colocation service provider is no different from purchasing a new home. You wouldn't want critical information and processes to reside in a facility that is far-removed, susceptible to outages and breaches, and lacks the necessary amenities to sustain day-to-day business operations and growth.

This vendor-written piece has been edited by Executive Networks Media to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favour the submitter's approach.

Imagine excitedly stepping into the new home you've purchased, only to realise almost immediately that the power isn't working, the Internet hasn't been connected and the electrician and tech support guys are nowhere in sight. To make matters worse, you hear from your new neighbours that there have been burglaries in the vicinity.

For most companies, the process of licensing space from a data centre colocation service provider is no different from purchasing a new home. You wouldn't want critical information and processes to reside in a facility that is far-removed, susceptible to outages and breaches, and lacks the necessary amenities to sustain day-to-day business operations and growth.

Finding the right data centre to make a long-term investment and to house your key digital assets will therefore require in-depth research and strategic selection. The exploding demands placed on IT infrastructure (especially as Big Data, cloud adoption and IoT continue to grow) and the high operating costs make it difficult for in-house data centres to keep pace. Driven by digital transformation initiatives in APAC, IT-dependent businesses are increasingly expected to turn to data centre colocation, with the global market for colocation services set to reach US$36 billion by 2017.

As you examine which third-party data centre is right for your organisation, aside from price, here are a few key characteristics to consider.

Location, location, location

When selecting your new home, you would want to have easy access to public amenities, so that transportation, connectivity and power supply don't become issues you have to constantly worry about. Likewise, location is paramount when selecting a data centre facility. Several factors should be considered during evaluation, such as proximity to your company location and customers, geographical stability, and access to a reliable and uninterrupted power supply.

The location of your colocation provider goes beyond just being easy for your staff or your customers to physically travel to. A nearby location lowers latency, allowing your staff or customers to access their data quickly. This is essential given today's dynamic business environment and the desire for information and services to be delivered on-demand, and in real-time.

Having a reliable and uninterrupted power supply is critical in ensuring that your equipment, and more importantly, your data, isn't compromised even in the case of a nationwide power failure. Singapore, for example, has become one of the leading data centre hub in Southeast Asia, as its sound infrastructure makes it easier for companies to build power infrastructure and gridlines to support the dissemination, allocation, and re-allocation of power - one of the must-haves for constant uptime and efficiency.

 

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