Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

VR and Beyond: Powering the Immersive Computing Era

Mark Papermaster, CTO of AMD | Sept. 16, 2016
Today, society not only accepts and uses mobile technology, but it has become part of the fabric of our daily lives. From VR and smart homes, to autonomous cars – there seems to be no limit to what is possible and where the technology can be embedded.

This vendor-written piece has been edited by Executive Networks Media to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favour the submitter's approach.

Today, society not only accepts and uses mobile technology, but it has become part of the fabric of our daily lives. From VR and smart homes, to autonomous cars - there seems to be no limit to what is possible and where the technology can be embedded.

Beyond Virtual Reality

In January of this year, Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum, stated that we stand on the brink of a technological revolution. He said that the speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent and it's expanding at an exponential rate. I think he is right.

We are in an age where devices are almost all connected and have multiple sensors to enable contextual awareness. Voice and image recognition capabilities are becoming increasingly accurate. Graphics rendering and ultra-high resolution displays are creating near mirror-like visualisations. And rapid advancement and adoption of open source software is speeding up application development. 

All these drivers combined point towards an immersive computing era. This era will be characterised by fully networked connections among people, processes and data, changing how we interact with people and technology, and how we learn, work and play. We will be immersed in computational power and intelligence. Technology will surround us and become even more pervasive in our daily lives. Technology will interact with us in ways we're only starting to imagine. Virtual Reality is a great example.

A number of technology watchers predict VR will dramatically change education and the landscape of many industries ranging from retail to military, healthcare to entertainment, and gaming to fashion. Recent estimates suggest the market for VR will reach $80 billion by 2025. Regardless of the market size, examples of the possibilities already exist. Imagine being able to learn history by being fully immersed in recreations of actual events, but my favourite is the Royal London Hospital, who captured a tumour surgery with 360 degree cameras, as part of a programme designed to educate medical students and the public at large about surgical training. The lead physician believes VR could make healthcare more equitable, improving surgeon training worldwide.

As exciting as VR is, it's possible that augmented reality (AR) has even greater potential. AR combines VR with a real world overlay to create what is referred to as mixed reality, spanning the experiential space between the real environment and a fully virtual reality.

Moore's Law Plus

With such exciting potential of what technology could deliver, we often forget that developments such as VR has only been made possible to due advancements in semiconductor technology. In particular, we have seen vast improvements in energy efficiency and increased processing power - along with increasingly immersive graphics and display technologies.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.