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The next big (IT) thing

AvantiKumar | May 5, 2014
Do you see a half full or half empty glass when you plot a course through the challenges of the next big IT trend while ensuring your organisation can reap the business benefits?

AvantiKumar

 

Do you see a half full or half empty glass when you plot a course through the challenges of the next big IT trend while ensuring your organisation can reap the business benefits? "Each new IT trend is a major Change that brings benefits and challenges-and not always in equal measure," said one IT head to me during a recent event in Kuala Lumpur. "While some of these 'next big things' may still be in the hype stage, the speed of adoption is increasingly catching IT on the hop. Stress is the norm."

The next big thing is already here. Mobility, both as technology and as a behavioural change, is bringing enormous security challenges from within and without the organisation. The coverage of this year's Computerworld Malaysia security summit in this issue lists some of the ever-increasing threats that this trend has brought. The conversations about the mobile revolution among IT professionals in Malaysia are already about the impact of wearable technology and the Internet of Things.

In a recent Computerworld article, IDC reports that total global wearables sales will exceed 19 million units this year. By 2018, international sales will hit 111.9 million units, resulting in a year-over-year, compound annual growth rate of 78.4 percent, according to IDC projections.

And in simpler terms, the sales jump over four years projects out to a total increase just under 500 percent. Meanwhile, Deloitte Consulting managing partner technology agenda, Robert Hillard, said the company predicts smart glasses, fitness bands and watches are likely to sell around ten million units in 2014, generating US$3 billion in revenue.

Organisations are looking for the opportunities from wearable technology, which is part of a still developing trend of the 'Internet of things.' Jawbone's EMEA channel and partner development head, Jorgen Nordin, told IDG that it is people who really power wearable devices. "Wearable products talk to each other and have the potential to make it easier to navigate the Internet of Things [IoT]."

A principal analyst at Forrester Andrew Rose warns that among the security considerations with IoT "is that an object, whether it's a truck, a vending machine or a medicine bottle, will become a part of a network environment as virtual presences. These virtual presences will begin to interact and exchange contextual information, [and] the devices will make decisions based on this contextual device. This will lead to very physical threats, around national infrastructure, possessions [for example, cars and homes], environment, power, water and food supply, and so on."

Recently, a friend reminded me that it's all essentially a question of balanced perception: Maybe we can manage the stress of facing big changes when we try and see both the half full and the half empty glass- at the same time?

- AvantiKumar, Editor, Computerworld Malaysia & Malaysia Country Correspondent for ENM Channels

 

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