Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

How health wearables enhance telemedicine

Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) | April 27, 2015
Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) talks about how technology is interacting and influencing healthcare.

Health care organizations can share patient information with each other, and in turn have a better understanding of the overall situation, especially if patients are transferred from one hospital to another. Patient outcomes improve, and medical professionals benefit from a faster and more accurate way of tracking patient information. That can serve to streamline health care processes. 

According to research from the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)®, 44 percent of fitness tracker owners are willing to share personal data with third-party apps or other service providers.

Meanwhile, robots are making improvements in the health care industry as reliable caregivers and even surgical assistants. Google recently announced a partnership with Johnson & Johnson to promote the use of surgical robotics. Though still in their infancy, surgical robots allow for the integration of even more advanced technologies, such as using cameras and guided hand controls during operation, reducing the need for more invasive procedures.

The nature of health care as we know it today is rapidly changing as a result of the evolution of consumer technologies, with mobile devices and wearables leading the way. As governments around the world contend with issues such as aging populations and the associated increase in health care-related expenditures, consumer technologies can reduce the cost of care, improve health care quality and potentially alleviate the strain on government resources. Mobile health devices and telemedicine are the future, and will play an increasingly important role in our lives in the years and decades ahead.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.