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Growth fears: how can businesses align business growth with employee satisfaction?

Sabby Gill, Executive Vice President, Epicor Software International | May 19, 2016
The reality is that progress is part of doing business, and with some careful planning and forward-thinking, the growth period does not have to be ridden with pain.

Morris believes that a key predictor of job satisfaction is whether employees find 'meaning' in their work and warns that an employee's personal values and missions can become misaligned with the company's goals once the company starts growing.

"If I am asked to do things outside of the boundaries with which I joined the company, suddenly I may be less committed to it. If employees have less of a connection with the tasks involved or when they take on too many new tasks, too fast then it creates job dissatisfaction."

It is vital to have the right infrastructure in place to support employees during growth. If technology can be used to ease the strain of increased workloads, employees can even find themselves empowered by growth. They may, for example, find themselves working on a wider variety of tasks, working closely with leadership to drive growth, and gaining more access to corporate knowledge if their roles are facilitated by the right technology.

How can businesses reduce the 'pain' of growth and plan ahead?

Any big change in a business - especially a surge in growth - can be disruptive and can filter through the organisation. According to Morris, this collective expression of pain typically manifests as resistance or disengagement. But businesses can get ahead of this curve by planning for any potential problems and ensuring they have enough resources to cater to increasing demands by the workforce.

The Epicor survey findings revealed that the top two stimulants for growth are 'technology leadership' (40%) and 'skilled workforce' (39%). This can be a two-edged sword. Organisations that are stuck with legacy systems might find themselves falling behind, unable to adapt to new business processes, or meet the demands of employees who expect modern technology in order to do their jobs. On the other hand, the organisations that leap onto new technology, will find themselves ahead of their competitors, ready to embrace new challenges.

A key facilitator in managing this process smoothly is to make investments in the right technology as the "demand for quick communication and transaction" increases.

Many progressive businesses are already doing this - according to the Epicor research 79% of businesses have made or are making investments in integrated IT infrastructure. Increased data visibility, for example through the use of the latest enterprise resource planning (ERP) solutions, can allow businesses to perform in-depth analysis of key KPIs, so that they can manage costings and profitability more confidently. Customer relationships can likewise continue to prosper during the growth period with agile and scalable ERP and manufacturing execution systems (MES) that meet their demands.

According to Morris, employees need "emotional support to withstand the pressures of growing." He also recommends "fostering a robust culture so people can be resilient throughout the growth surge." It's clear that this culture can be more robust if people are supported by the technology they need to do their jobs. Although it seems counter-intuitive, e.g., deploying technology in support of an emotional challenge, investment in the right IT infrastructure is therefore essential, and will help maintain the emotional well-being of employees throughout this transitionary period.

 

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