Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

BLOG: Your BYOD category

Daniel J. Lohrmann | April 26, 2013
Daniel Lohrmann provides guidelines to categorising your BYOD situation based on your approach to items such as company policies, security, reimbursement plan and use of mobile device management (MDM) software.

Let's start by categorizing your BYOD situation based on your employer's approach to items such as company policies, security, reimbursement plan and use of mobile device management (MDM) software. I describe three common BYOD workplace scenarios as gold (the strongest, most in-depth policy), silver (some policy) and bronze (limited or no policy) and use these categories to describe other factors affecting your BYOD experience.

For example, if your company has a strong BYOD policy, you are fully reimbursed for bringing your own device to work and your company deploys MDM software, you will probably use the gold advice. On the other hand, if you do not receive any stipend for bringing your own device, your company has no BYOD policy and no MDM software is deployed, you should follow the bronze advice.

What's Your Level? Defining Gold, Silver, Bronze

  • Work Policy: BYOD policy
  • Security Policy Enforcement: Strong
  • Mobile Device Management (MDM): Yes
  • Smartphone Monthly Cost Reimbursement: Good
  • Use of Own Device for Daily Work: Extensive (most online activities)

  • Work Policy: Some policy applies
  • Security Policy Enforcement: Varies
  • Mobile Device Management (MDM): Minimal, may sync w/ Microsoft Exchange
  • Smartphone Monthly Cost Reimbursement: Partial, sometimes
  • Use of Own Device for Daily Work: Mixed (email, browsing, several apps

  • Work Policy: No BYOD policy
  • Security Policy Enforcement: Varies
  • Mobile Device Management (MDM): None for personal devices
  • Smartphone Monthly Cost Reimbursement: None
  • Use of Own Device for Daily Work: Generally light (email only)

Consider these examples to help determine which category suits your situation:

Trevor, a new employee at a Big Four accounting firm, has decided to bring his Apple iPhone to the office rather than be burdened by an additional work phone. His new company has clear policies on BYOD and will fully reimburse him for all of his device costs, including a state-of-the-art MDM software package that he's required to install. He's concerned about monitoring and others seeing his personal data.

Rob moved from a Blackberry to a new Samsung Galaxy S III Android phone at Christmas. He wants to start using his new phone at work since his company will allow him to synchronize his email with the office's Microsoft Exchange email servers. There is also a BYOD policy laying out several aspects of accessing data, security and privacy. However, Rob is not reimbursed for using his own device nor offered a choice on what MDM software he can download. He is torn on whether to just stick with one of the company-offered smartphones, since all expenses are paid, or enjoy the freedom to choose to upgrade to a new device whenever he wants.

Elaine has been bringing her iPad to work for more a year. She likes its familiarity, which helps her work faster. The problem is her employer has no policy on using a personal device for work. She is not reimbursed for her use of her iPad or iPhone, but she still benefits by using the high-speed wireless access at the office. While security enforcement of the acceptable uses of technology policies is generally strong, everyone seems to look the other way when employees use their personal devices. Without a clear policy, Elaine constantly worries about company security policies, the privacy of her data and possibly being reprimanded -- or fired -- for what she's doing. 

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.