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8 reasons to backup your data to the cloud

Jan-Jaap Jager, Acronis Vice President of Asia Pacific/Japan and Emerging Markets | Sept. 8, 2015
If you use a computer, digital camera or a mobile phone, you most likely have experienced the pain of losing data and the stressful realisation that the files may never be recovered.

This vendor-written piece has been edited by Executive Networks Media to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favour the submitter's approach.

If you use a computer, digital camera or a mobile phone, you most likely have experienced the pain of losing data and the stressful realisation that the files may never be recovered.

If you think it will never happen to you, think again. There are eight compelling reasons to start running backups.

1. System breach or equipment failure.
A report published by The Online Trust Alliance earlier this year demonstrated that 40 percent of data loss incidents are caused by external hacking, 29 percent by accidental or malicious data deletion, while 18 percent were due to stolen devices and 11 percent caused by fraud.

Short lifespan of computer hardware (median life span of hard drives is six years) and accidental damage, such as dropping a phone in water, compounds statistics further.

Growing dependence on mobile devices stresses the importance of data backup because every single mobile device represents an end point where data can be lost, stolen or compromised.

2. Business continuity.
How much is your data worth to you? The US-based National Computer Security Association estimates that it takes up to 42 days to restore 20 MBs of engineering data, at a cost of US$98,000.

Another report published by The British Chambers of Commerce shows that 93 percent of businesses that are not able to restore the lost data for more than 10 days file for bankruptcy within one year, because of the financial implications and the negative effect on the company’s reputation.

3. Malware threat.
A survey conducted by Kaspersky Labs Internet security firm stated that 35 percent of data loss incidents are caused by malware infection. While system backup does not stop the computer from contracting a virus, it provides an opportunity to restore it to its pre-infected state.

It is important, however, to verify that the saved backup is free of viruses before restoring the system. Some cloud backup solutions, such as Acronis True Image, allows users to browse through files in the cloud to perform this task.

4. Limited disk space on personal devices.
Personal computers and hand-held devices have limited disk space, and manufacturers are charging premium for extra gigabytes, knowing that consumers are prepared to pay for extra storage. Backing up and moving your less frequently used files, such as photos and documents to the cloud will free space on your device and prolong its useful life.

5. Single-window access to files.
Copying files from multiple computers, CDs, flash drives and mobile phones to cloud storage simplifies file management and reduces the risk of data loss. Instead of spending hours searching through files on flash drives or CD-ROMs, cloud storage allows consumers to search and browse for individual files irrespective from which device they were initially backed up.

 

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